CDC Study

The CDC just released a new report studying pedestrian traffic related deaths for the years 2001-2010. (Here is the link: Motor Vehicle Traffic-Related Pedestrian Deaths – United States 2001-2010). Pedestrians make up 10.5% of all trips from one place to another but represent 13% of all traffic related deaths. That’s only 2.5% higher than the proportionate number of trips. That does not seem too skewed given the fact pedestrian injuries are much more severe than car-on-car injuries generally speaking.

Here are a few of the CDC’s key takeaways:

  • Pedestrian deaths are higher for males than females, almost 2.5 times higher. Why is this? Are there more men walking than women? Do men take more risks when walking on the street?
  • Pedestrian death rates are highest for the elderly, people over the age of 75. This makes sense, give the elderly’s vision and hearing are starting to decline and their bodies cannot absorb or recover from being hit by a car like a younger person’s can.
  • Pedestrian deaths are higher in large, central metro areas. This makes complete sense. More pedestrians in large urban areas and more cars on the roads.

So how well does this match up with Atlanta, which is the CDC’s home? Transportation for America ranked Atlanta as #11 in its “pedestrian danger index.” For pedestrian deaths, Atlanta is actually # 44. Regardless, pedestrian safety is something Atlanta needs to continue to work on as it grows and plans its next wave of urban growth. If you are interested in participating in that discussion, we highly suggest you check out PEDS.org (Pedestrians Educating Drivers on Safety). They are doing a great job working with Atlanta government, urban designers, and community organizations to increase awareness for pedestrian safety.

If you have been hurt as a pedestrian in Atlanta, or are interested in knowing the law surrounding who is at fault when a car hits a pedestrian, check out our site’s section on pedestrians hit by car accidents.